Tel Aviv Savidor Central Railway Station Panorama, Israel

Tel Aviv Savidor Central railway station (Hebrew: תֵּל אָבִיב סָבִידוֹר מֶרְכָּז‬, Tel Aviv Savidor Merkaz, Arabic: تل أبيب مركز سافيدور‎) is the main central train station of Tel Aviv. It is one of the main railway hubs of Israel, located on the eastern side of Tel Aviv, at the border between Tel Aviv and Ramat Gan. The station was opened to the public in November 1954 under the name Tel Aviv Central, and throughout its history was widely known as Arlozorov station due to its location in the eastern end of Arlozorov street, Tel Aviv, and next to the Arlozorov Interchange of Ayalon Highway.

The station serves most rail lines in Israel and has 6 passenger platforms—more than any other station in Israel—and is also the busiest in terms of passenger movements, serving a daily average of 70,073 passengers in December 2014. Despite not being a terminus for most lines, it serves as a terminal for travel to all parts of Israel. The station is located next to the 2000 Terminal in the west and the Diamond Exchange District (of Ramat Gan) in the east. Like all railway stations in Tel Aviv, the tracks lie between the southbound and northbound lanes of the Ayalon Highway. The tracks are connected by escalators, stairways and elevators for disabled persons to a bridge which connects them with the terminal building (on the Tel Aviv side) and the Diamond Exchange District (on the Ramat Gan side). In 2018 a northern access pavilion fronting Modaii bridge opened, adding a third passenger entry and exit point out of the station facilitating additional access to the Diamond Exchange District. An underground station of the future Red Line light rail is being built at the site to be opened by October 2021. An option exists of adding a fourth island platform at the station as part of the four-tracking project of the Ayalon Railway which would serve future tracks 7 and 8 starting in the late 2020s.

The station is named after Menachem Savidor, Israel Railways' chairman between 1954–1964 and later the speaker of the Knesset.

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